Ravel's Boléro in Rock Music Throughout the Decades - Version 2

This is a video that I've posted on Youtube that plays short clips of the Bolero beat that is found in the songs below. This is the "cheat sheet" version so that you don't have to browse the songs below if you don't want to. Most songs are included (of course except for those I've added after creating this video!)

Ravel's Bolero

Boléro by Maurice Ravel (1928). Wikipedia article here.An impressive performance of Ravel's Boléro by the orchestra directed by the Dutch violinist and conductor Andre Rieu. Notice the rhythm, and especially the drumbeat, that's played throughout and then listen to the rock songs below; you can hear the Boléro in them.

Running Scared by Roy Orbison

Running Scared by Roy Orbison (1961). Wikipedia article about the song here. A cover of the song by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds is here.

The Bolero beat is played from start to finish.

Paint It Black by the Rolling Stones

Paint It Black by the Rolling Stones (1966).

The Bolero beat runs from 2:20 to 2:40.

White Rabbit by Jefferson Airplane

White Rabbit by Jefferson Airplane (1967). Wikipedia article here. The rhythm similar to Boléro is pronounce throughout the song.

"Set to a rising crescendo similar to that of Ravel's famous Boléro" - from Wikipedia article

You Keep Me Hanging On by Vanilla Fudge

You Keep Me Hanging On by Vanilla Fudge (1967). Wikipedia article about Vanilla Fudge here.

The Boléro beat is played from the 1:07 to 1:20 mark.

Beck's Bolero by the Jeff Beck Group

Beck's Bolero by Jeff Beck (1967). Wikipedia article here.


"Beck's Bolero" is a short, rock-based instrumental piece heavily influenced by Maurice Ravel's Boléro, recorded by Jeff Beck with Jimmy Page on guitar, John Paul Jones on bass, Nicky Hopkins on piano, and Keith Moon on drums." - from Wikipedia article

1983 (A Merman I Should Turn to Be) by Jimi Hendrix

1983 (A Merman I Should Turn to Be) by Jimi Hendrix (1968) Wikipedia article about the song here

The bolero beat kicks in at 12:20.

How Many More Times by Led Zeppelin

How Many More Times by Led Zeppelin (1969). Wikipedia article here.

It consists of several smaller sections held together by a bolero rhythm that pushes the piece along. At the end, the song pans between the left and right channels. Elements of this song are faintly reminiscent of previously-recorded instrumental "Beck's Bolero" by Jeff Beck" - from Wikipedia article

The Boléro piece starts at the 3:10 mark.

Lizard ("Bolero - The Peacock's Tale") by King Crimson

Lizard ("Bolero - The Peacock's Tale") by King Crimson (1970). Wikipedia article here.

"Bolero" provides a showcase for the supporting musicians Tippett, Miller, Charig, and Evans. Playing over McCulloch's bolero-like drum part, they are given the space to develop progressively more jazzy solos around a central theme. When this section of "Lizard" was excerpted for inclusion on the compilation Frame by Frame: The Essential King Crimson, Gordon Haskell's bass guitar was replaced with a part recorded by subsequent King Crimson bassist Tony Levin.

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